Thursday, September 04, 2008

Spring - Blueberries and Guiding Principles

It is now officially spring now, in Australia, and of course, as is usual, that means changeable weather and our warm sunny winter days seem to have morphed into rainy wintery skies.

No matter. Spring brings renewal and the gardens begin to wake up and so too, my new blueberry bush that I planted a few days ago. I'm getting conflicting stories. At the nursery, I was told the bush would grow 1 metre x 1 metre, yet others report they grow much taller. Is it a difference of variety, or something else? We shall see. And of course, I realise now, that I will need to put a net over it, or the birds shall beat me to every berry.
How does a blueberry bush know when it is tall enough?

I was thinking about renewal and how that fits with What Was... and what Will Be. And the agency that works behind the scenes to deliver our new Present. And it occured to me to wonder, how aware are we generally, of our motivations, our boundaries and where our things-we-would-be-prepared-to-do, bump up against those-things-we-would-not-do.

I think it would be a worthwhile exercise to articulate our own personal Manifesto. I shall be considering that very thing in the next few days.

What about you?

What Are Your Guiding Principles?

Where did they come from? Did you inherit them, or did you determine them, consciously?

How do you communicate your guiding principles to others? To your family, your friends, your customers, your prospects?

Do you live in alignment with your guiding principles?



Perhaps for a blueberry bush too, it is the genetic map that is imprinted with it's own kind of guiding principles that lets it know how tall, is tall enough.






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Lindy Asimus
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2 comments:

James Leonard said...

Like fruit trees a business can be so focused on growing up that there is little fleshing out. An arborist has to break the apical dominance and allow the the lower limbs to grow. This keeps the fruit closer together and nearer the ground, enabling the pickers to reach it more efficiently.
I have enjoyed reading your posts

Lindy said...

Thanks James.

Strangely, I'm at the stage in my garden where I am able to remove the lower branches of the larger trees in my garden and as I 'raise their skirts' - suddenly there emerges an understory. A place for all kinds of new plantings that can enjoy this secret and dappled shady environment.

Same space - expanded potential/